child rebel soldier
Everyday Is Not A “Fiasco”

Dec
23

Last 2 weeks have been crazy! FNF is def on full blast these days, with THE COOL hittin’ shelves last week! Numbers are looking very good, should be doing at least 160k+ 1st week, which is incredible! Thanks to all the fans for copping the album, appreciate the support!

This week it’s off to Hawaii for the FNF crew for a special Myspace ‘Release’ event @ Pipeline Cafe. Then it’s back to NYC to do David Letterman on 1/2 (make sure u tune in for a crazy HOT performance of “Superstar”)!

Well, I’m out for now – time to get ready for Christmas! Still got some shopping to do! Oh, and don’t forget to check out the “Blog” on LupeFiasco.com – Bishop G will be the blogger on there, aight? FNF UP!!!!

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Dec
10

It’s the best of times and the worst of times for Lupe Fiasco. As of next week’s release of his sophomore effort Lupe Fiasco’s The Cool, he remains critically beloved. Plus, the day I called him, he’d just received his fourth Grammy nomination for “Daydreamin,’” off his debut, Lupe Fiasco’s Food & Liquor. Meanwhile, he’s had a rough couple of months, flubbing the words to A Tribe Called Quest’s song “Electric Relaxation” at the VH1 Hip Hop Honors awards in October, and then threatening legal action against Vibe after they quoted him saying Tribe wasn’t all that. (He complained that Vibe misrepresented the timing of the quotes, and Vibe issued a correction.) On the phone from L.A., he doesn’t backpedal from his recent assertion that he may quit recording after The Cool’s follow-up, but does talk about his love for Chris Brown and, unexpectedly, Ian Astbury.

Read the interview here!

8 Days until THE COOL! FNF UP!!!

Dec
08
Dec
08

Taken from Buzznet.com

Lupe Fiasco’s Best of 2007
Lupe’s musical taste is oh so very cool …

Top 10 Albums of 2007:

1. Unkle – War Stories
2. Kanye West – Graduation
3. Jay-Z – American Gangster
4. Radiohead – In Rainbows
5. Foo Fighters – Echoes Silence Patience & Grace
6. Linkin Park – Minutes To Midnight
7. UGK – Underground Kingz
8. Trey Songz – Trey Day
9. T-Pain – Epiphany
10. Chris Brown – Exclusive

Dec
05
Dec
01

Lupe Fiasco’s got a mind that runs a mile a minute, and a mouth that can keep up with it. The sharp-tongued Chicago MC will follow-up last year’s well-received Lupe Fiasco’s Food & Liquor with Lupe Fiasco’s The Cool, due December 18 from 1st & 15th/Atlantic. We phoned Lupe and did our best to keep up as he talked about the character-based concept behind The Cool, the album’s darker hues, the infamous cheeseburger track, radio and comic book spin-offs, Child Rebel Soldiers, Cornel West, and his plans to “retire” after his third album.

click here to read the entire interview @ pitchforkmedia.com

Nov
30

from THE COOL hittin’ the web! Keep checking around…

December 18th!!! fnf up

Nov
22

NEW FNF RADIO EPISODE UP NOW!!!…TURKEY-DAY EDITION!!!!

IT DONT STOP FNF RADIO IS BACK IN FULL EFFECT…

AND SPEAKING OF “FULL” ITS THANKSGIVING AND FNF RADIO IS BRINGING YOU A SPECIAL TURKEY-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA OF A SHOW!!!!

CHILLS, SPILLS AND THRILLS AND OF COURSE ALL THINGS FNF!!!

TUNE IN NOW @ FNFRADIO.MYPODCAST.COM

ITS FNF RADIO HOSTED BY BISHOP “PILGRIM KILLER” G & LUPE “CANDY YAMS” FIASCO!!!

FNF UP!!!

Nov
21

i’m coppin!

lupe_preorder.jpg

Nov
20

lupe-fiasco-entertainment.jpg

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Tell me about where your first single, ”Superstar,” came from. That seems to be about the experience of a musician rising to fame, right?

LUPE FIASCO: I took the looseness of the record from a Tom Waits song off his new album, Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards. The record comes from taking different themes and very dark, very macabre scenes, and placing them in a very poppy, commercial realm. There’s many instances in the song, but one of the main instances is, [if] going to heaven was like a club, and so you had to wait, and the beautiful people went in front of you. Then there would be situations where I would contrast an execution [that] looks like a performance — people are waiting to see this person die, and they fill up the front row to watch a man die. It comes from, how am I digesting being famous and celebrity? It’s like success and fame balanced with tragedy and infamy.

Another new song, ”Little Weapon,” was produced by Patrick Stump from Fall Out Boy. What was it like working with him?

He called me, like, ”I want to do a record for The Cool.” And I was telling people, ”This album’s dark, so the music needs to be dark but futuristic.” So he sent the beat for ”Little Weapon.” And I had a set list of things that I wanted to address on this album: I wanted to address the climate, which I didn’t really do, and I wanted to address child soldiers. I actually met these guys that run this organization called Invisible Children backstage at a Fall Out Boy show, and I did ”Little Weapon” as an ode to that [issue]. My partner Bishop G is on there taking the last verse. And the twist in the story is the little kid playing the video game — is he any different from the child soldier actually killing people? Because death is death, whether it’s digital death or real death.

How about ”Streets on Fire,” where you bring in the character of The Streets?

At the beginning of the song, [singer] Matthew Santos lists all these tragedies, and then it says, ”She’s out there smiling.” It comes from 1984, the book, where there was so much double-talk and double-think in the first few chapters. That’s my favorite book. I tried to put that in a record. So it’s like, ”Believe/So say the neon signs by the loudspeakers/Repeating that everything is fine.” You know? ”A subtle silence/To demolish the troubled conscience/Of a populace with no knowledge/And every freedom denied.” It comes directly influenced by 1984 — using it as a vehicle to introduce one of the characters very abstractly, very subtly.

”Dumb it Down” is another song that I heard a few weeks ago on YouTube. Those catchy hooks with different people urging you to dumb down your music. Do you really get that a lot?

It’s kind of perceived. My peoples that frequent clubs and go in the streets and things of that nature, they’ll be like, ”Yo man, this is what they’re saying in the hood: ‘I’m not really feeling Lupe.”’ Those are real conversations that I get the gist of. And then the second hook is more Big Brother-influenced, which is that unspoken — and in some cases spoken behind closed doors — mentality and agenda of a lot of different [record] companies. To actually be like, ”Let’s push some bulls— today.” That song touches on one of the base themes for The Cool: I went to go see Cornel West speak, and he said, ”If you really want to affect social change in the world, you have to make those things which are cool and destructive, uncool. You have to make it hip to be square.” ”Dumb it Down” was showing that. Like, the verses are super-duper complex, but the hook itself is telling the verses, like, ”Damn, yo, dumb it down! This is why we’re saying you need to dumb it down. Nobody just got that verse you just said, and that’s why you’re really not going to sell too many records.” It’s showing that: ”They’re starting to think that smart is cool, Lu/Dumb it down/They’re starting to get up out the hood, Lu/Dumb it down.” It’s like, ”We need to keep them there so we can constantly sell them things.”

I heard in a few songs there you mentioned the name of your next album, L-U-P-End. So I take it you’re sticking to your promise of making three albums and then you’re out?

Yeah, I think so. I’m 85 percent. My final album is L-U-P-End, and it comes from video games. I love video games, especially Capcom, and you can only put three letters when the game is over — three letters and ”END.”

Read entire interview here!